Happy Halloween and All Hallow’s Eve Giveaway!

*****CONTEST CLOSED*****

Congratulations to Irene and Shirley who are the winners of ALL HALLOW’S EVE!!! I hope you enjoy this exciting collection of romantic spooky stories! Thank you to all who entered!

To celebrate Halloween, I am giving away a copy of ALL HALLOWS’ EVE, an exciting addition to the popular Timeless Romance Anthology series. ALL HALLOWS’ EVE is not to be missed! It has romance, thrills, and chills. Need I say more?

To enter the giveaway to win the Ebook, simply leave a comment in the comments section below telling me:

  1. 1. your name
  2. 2. which format you need–Mobi for Kindle, epub for most E-readers, or a PDF which can be read on most tablets, phones, and computers
  3. 3. your email address.

*****CONTEST CLOSED*****

Here are the blurbs for each of the six different stories by six best-selling authors: Sarah M. Eden, Annette Lyon, Heather B. Moore, Lisa Mangum, Jordan McCollum, Elana Johnson.

In Sarah M. Eden’s mysterious novella OF GHOSTS AND GARDENS, if Enid Pryce has one downfall, it’s that she talks to the ghost in her garden, which doesn’t make her too popular among society’s elite. In fact, she returns to her home in Wales after a Season in Bath with not one offer of marriage. Deeming herself a failure at the nearly-spinster age of nineteen, she is pleasantly surprised when an English gentleman shows up in her garden, apparently intent on finding out more about the ghost. Burke Kennard, grandson of an English marquess, quickly becomes utterly charmed by the young Welsh woman, but the ghost in the garden is more likely to push them apart than pull them together.

In Annette Lyon’s enthralling story IT’S YOU, when Charlie and Anna both see the ghost of Nanny Mae, they think they’re losing their minds. Anna tries to find out more about the ghost and uncovers a decades’ old family secret. One that separated two people in love. Now, the ghost of Nanny Mae must set her wrongs to right. As Charlie and Anna explore the past, and the truth of what happened, they discover that the mistakes of the past might lead to love of the future.

In SOPHIA’S CURSE, a suspenseful novella by Heather B. Moore, Joan grows up in an abbey in France, believing that she is an orphan. A chance encounter with the foreboding owner of a neighboring estate, alters everything she’s understood about her parents. She discovers she’s an integral part of changing a decades-old curse, and that her life, as well as the handsome and intriguing Simon Rousseau’s life, are both in danger unless she makes an enormous sacrifice that will change the course of her dreams.

In Lisa Mangum’s haunting story THE SIRENS’ SONG, we meet recently widowed Oliver, the lead physician on a luxury cruise liner traveling to Greece. He hopes that the change of scenery will help ease his grief over his deceased wife, Cate. After falling overboard, though, he is captured by a siren and taken to a mystical island. Through the sirens’ song, Oliver is able to relive his memories of Cate—both the good and the bad—as long as he gives away his memories of her. But can he sacrifice his best memory in exchange for one last chance to say good-bye?

In Jordan McCollum’s thrilling novella THE MAN OF HER DREAMS, homicide detective Alexandra Steen dreams about real murders before they happen, seeing the crime through the eyes of the killers. But the dreams never contain enough clues to save the victim before it’s too late. Then one dream ends before a murder occurs—in a place she knows. She finds herself racing against time to prevent the deadly act, only to discover that the intended victim is a man she thought she’d never see again. Seven years might have passed since her breakup with Nick, but the years haven’t changed her feelings for him. Now, she must convince Nick that her dreams are real and find a way to prevent his death.

In Elana Johnson’s chilling story THE GHOST OF MILLHOUSE MANSION, Naomi knows her crush on Colt Jennings is unreasonable. When he invites her to his reclusive mansion to restore an old wooden rocking horse, Naomi can’t resist accepting the job. The more time Naomi spends touring his home, the more interested she becomes in Colt. Until she sees a man in the library who vanishes into thin air. She thinks she’s losing her mind until Colt tells her about the ghosts he’s been seeing for years.

ALL HALLOWS’ EVE is:

Amazon #1 Bestselling series in *New Release* for Clean Romance
Amazon Top 10 in Gothic Romance
Amazon Top 25 in Mystery & Suspense

I will do the random Drawing and announce the names on Monday, October 30th. will Remember, to enter to giveaway for the Ebook, simply leave a comment in the comments section below OR email me at donna@donnahatch.com and I will enter you. Please include:

  1. your name
  2. which format you need–Mobi for Kindle, epub for most E-readers, or a PDF which can be read on most tablets, phones, and computers
  3. your email address.

*****CONTEST CLOSED*****

English Drawing Room

by Donna Hatch

                        Petworth House

Few rooms are as quintessentially English as the Drawing Room. The very word Drawing Room inspires a host of images, doesn’t it? “Drawing room” is a shortened version of the term “Withdrawing room” for that time after dinner when ladies withdrew to allow the gentlemen to discuss manly pursuits not considered proper in mixed company such as politics, sports, news, etc. By the Regency Era, the term had shortened to simply “drawing room.”

                       Polesdon Lacey

During the day, a British host or hostess often received guests in the drawing room or parlor. During chilly months, they partitioned off one end of the room with screens to keep in the warmth, and gathered together near the hearth. When not entertaining, ladies went to the drawing room of paint or sketch, sew or tat, do crafts such as glue ribbons or feathers on hats, or shell or beadwork, write letters, or keep journals. Evenings when British families stayed at home together, they gathered to read aloud or silently, play music or games, or simply talk–all in the drawing room.

For entertaining, they opened up the entire room and filled it with guests dressed in their finery, enjoying drinks, making business deals, making matches (also often business deals), and delighting over the latest on dits.

                                        Petworth House

 

The drawing room also served as a ballroom for those houses without a dedicated ballroom. If the dance occurred spontaneously, servants—and sometimes guests—moved furniture to the edges of the room and rolled up the carpets to allow room for dancing.

For formal balls, all this preparation was done ahead of time, with chairs placed against the walls and perhaps a few small tables where ladies might leave their reticules or fans or shawls while they danced. Married and older ladies generally occupied these chairs so they could gossip with their friends while the younger folk enjoyed the often vigorous dances.

                        Chawton House Hall

If a house or castle did not have a formal drawing room, the great hall, also known simply as the hall, served this purpose just as well.

Can’t you just imagine these rooms filled with ladies dressed in silk ball gowns dancing with gentlemen in their fine tailcoats?

Jane Austen Centre, Bath

The charming doorman of the Jane Austen Centre

When I visited the Jane Austen Centre at 40 Gay Street in Bath, I was unprepared for the “wow factor” I experienced. I entered their permanent exhibit in this Georgian home with high hopes of geeking out about one of my real-life heroines, a woman who defied the odds and met success as an author in an era when women were viewed as little more than baby machines or governesses, and when nice girls didn’t write and publish books.

However, this delightful place did more than feed my fan-girl hunger. From the doorman with his friendly smile, who, by the way, is the most photographed face in the UK, to the charming and lovely costumed guides who adore (worship?) Jane as much as I do, this is the ultimate destination for Jane-ites.

To educate and pique the interest of those who are not true fans of Jane Austen, the tour began with a movie highlighting Jane Austen’s life and career. Knowing more about her helped my husband have a greater appreciation for her and her influence on me as well as my writing.

Then the guides took us through the various exhibits describing her life, her family, her books, and how she first got published. She was ahead of her time in many ways, and ended up doing what is now known as indy publishing for her first few books.

Jane lived in Bath twice. And though many historians claimed she disliked her times there, it is irrefutable fact that her stays in Bath influenced her writing, and mostly in a positive way.

Do join me for a spot of tea.

Oh, Mr. Darcy!

There’s a place to try on authentic re-creations of Regency clothes for a photo shoot.

I swooned under the piercing gaze of the delicious Mr. Darcy!

Their gift shop, complete with a costumed cashier, was a fun place to browse tempting souvenirs. Yes, I indulged. I bought a lace fan, a bookend silhouette of Jane, some super fancy chocolates, and gifts for friends. Good thing I had limited luggage space or I might have come home with more!

They also have a tea shop where anyone can pop in and enjoy a spot of tea.

Do you enjoy Austen-era romances and Regency historical romances? Check out my novels, novellas, and short stories on my bookshelf or my Amazon author site.

To learn more about Jane Austen, visit these places:

Welcome to Jane Austen – www.janeausten.co.uk

https://www.biography.com/people/jane-austen-9192819?_escaped_fragment_=

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000807/bio

https://www.britannica.com/biography/Jane-Austen

Following Jane Austen’s footsteps in Chawton House

Chawton House is an Elizabethan manor in the village of Chawton in Hampshire, England. Formerly the property of Jane Austen’s brother, Edward Austen Knight, it is now is managed by the National Trust and open for tours. I couldn’t hardly wait to visit this historic site during my research tour in England.

The current Chawton house was built by the Knight family in the 1580s on the site of a medieval manor house dating back to the 1200s.  

The Knights were not quite in the class of gentlemen, but rather yeomen, which is a step below, but still considered respectable, ranking higher than the working class since they owned property with tenants. During the Elizabethan era, the Knight family embarked on the construction project for much of the present-day Chawton House. 

The 17th-century house was constructed of flint with a tile roof and stone dressings. The three gabled-south side has two storeys and an attic. It also possesses a famous library with an impressive number of books which were an expensive commodity in those days. Today many of those volumes are priceless. What makes this library so unique is the number of tomes written by women poets and novelists, and those written by men who were what people today would consider feminist they way they glorify women warriors. I wonder if they inspired Jane Austen in some small way.

Some good-looking guy keeps photo bombing my pictures. Oh, wait; that’s my husband 🙂

 Today’s entrance hall was once the great hall. Screens to help cut down on drafts originally stood along the great hall near the door, but later descendants walled off a walkway or passageway to keep the great hall warmer. 

                                  Buckets in the entrance hall.

When I first walked in, I noticed buckets along the ceiling. Apparently, they were stored there in the event of a fire; the residents could quickly form a bucket brigade.  

In later years, the Knight family was plagued by a lack of sons, and so many males who were not direct descendants inherited the house and property over the generations, each changing their birth surname to Knight to assume ownership of the property. The Knight family adopted Edward Austen, one of Jane Austen’s older brothers. Adoption was a very rare event in those days, and I have not yet discovered exactly why they chose Edward as their adopted son. The Knights were relatives who had no children and the Austens had 5 boys.

Formal adoptions — where parental rights are extinguished and a child became part of a new family– didn’t become legal until 1926 in England.  However there was a long tradition of a  family with many children a widower giving a child to a  richer family or childless family to raise and treat as their own. Often the father had papers drawn up–like a settlement– promising education and money to the child.  That is what happened with Edward Austen. He didn’t become Edward Austen Knight until both Mr. and Mrs. Knight were dead.
 According to Regency researcher, Nancy Mayer, Mr. Austen put it in writing that he allowed Mr. and Mrs. Knight  all the rights and privileges of parenthood over Edmund. The Knights could have reneged on  the agreement but then could have been sued like any other contract. If Mr. Austen had suddenly inherited a fortune or became a peer, Edward would still be in line for a child’s inheritance and second after James for the peerage. Being fostered by another family didn’t cut family relationships or rights of inheritance. However, when Edward’s adopted family died and he inherited the estate, he also changed his surname from Austen to Knight.

My gorgeous husband who is 5’8″ illustrates just how low the doorways are.

Jane Austen stayed in Chawton house on and off during her life. After Edward inherited the estate, he allowed his widowed birth mother and unmarried sisters, Jane and Cassandra, to live in a cottage nearby. It is here where Jane seemed most happy and enjoyed the most success as an author. 

                  The dining room at Chawton House

Chawton House was considered one of the big houses in the area. However, I was struck by its humble nature compared to other stately homes I toured during my visit to England. The rooms are small, dark, and cramped, with very low doorways. The floors on the upper levels slope dramatically. Still, compared to the cottage where Jane lived the last several years of her life, as well as the tiny and primitive tenant homes that must have been on the estate, it probably seemed grand, indeed. The house is full of quaint and charming rooms, many of which are furnished with the same furniture Jane and her brother used. I couldn’t help but reverently run my hand over the very table where Jane dined during her visits. 

Today’s estate on which Chawton house resides is approximate 275 acres. The grounds and gardens are lovely! I could have spent hours exploring them despite the record heatwave England suffered during part of my visit. The grounds offer a combination of a wilderness through which paths meander, and more formal gardens. Natural lawns spread out in all directions where animals graze, contained by discrete ditches cut into the hillside known as ha-has which are virtually unseen from the house. The grounds also have terraces, stone stairways, a profusion of flowers and flowering shrubs, fruit trees and shade trees, and comfortable places to sit and enjoy the great outdoors.

Edward’s house and garden made an impression on Jane Austen and seem to have influenced her novels, especially Emma. Some scholars believe Mr. Knightly’s Donwell Abbey was based upon the Knight family’s Chawton House. Perhaps this is why Jane chose the surname of Knightly for her fictional hero, who, by the way is one of my favorite Austen heroes. 

Tony & Julie Roberts in the back lawn of Chawton House. They are such a cute couple!

My friend and fellow Regency Author, Julie Roberts, and her husband Tony, were so kind to offer us their hospitality during this portion of our trip to England, and to bring us to this historic location. I will always appreciate their generosity.

Our friends, Tony & Julie Roberts sitting with my husband and me in their son and daughter-in-law’s backyard. We had a lovely visit with our attentive and gracious hosts!

 

Sources:

My visit in June of 2017, the Chawton House Guide, and Wikipedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bath, Time Traveling to Rome or Georgian England

by Donna Hatch

When Rome occupied England, the quaint English town now known as Bath was a hub for social, religious, heath, and recreational activities. The sick–those who could afford it–flocked to the healing mineral waters of a warm natural springs. They sought cures, or at least relief, from all manner of health complaints such as palsy, arthritis, gout, skin diseases including leprosy, and many chronic and terminal illnesses.  It seems that both genders bathed together, some clothed, some not. I’ll leave it up to your imagination to decide whether they stayed focused on getting relief from their ailments.

The engineering that went into creating the spa two thousand years ago is truly mind boggling. There are many rooms and a complex system of pumps and pipes that carry the water from the main spring to other parts of the elaborate Roman structure.

I might have been tempted to bathe in a shallow tub of the mineral water if I’d been allowed, but I would never have gone into that enormous pool of murky green water that occasionally bubbled unless I was desperate. It was also kinda creepy not being able to see the bottom. Still, I had to admire the workmanship that went into the design and construction of the building, and the fact that such an ancient structure remains. It is truly a testament to those who lived and worked here so long ago. In the midst of that venerable structure, I imagined people long gone visiting the spa. In the waters, some frolicked for pleasure, and others simply immersed themselves hoping for a miracle. All of them walked or were carried across the rocks that still bear the wear marks of thousands of feet.

Today, the original bath is open for tours but not for bathing so as to preserve its structure. Visitors are admonished not to even touch the water. Modern bath houses provide visitors the opportunity to bathe in the warm mineral waters that many agree has healing properties. Unfortunately, England was in the throes of one of the worst heat waves on record during my visit, so a warm bath lacked its usual appeal.

After the Romans pulled out of England, they abandoned this unique area to the ancient Saxons and Normans. Later, Christian churches arrived.

During the Georgian Era, Bath became a fashionable resort town. People came here to “take the waters,” a Georgian term meaning bathe in the warm mineral pools.

“Taking the waters” also meant to drink water from the Pump Room, which became a gathering place to socialize and flirt, as well as drink the water they believed had additional healing properties if ingested. Inside the Pump Room is a lovely, antique pump that squirts out water in a continuous fountain to allow those with the desire to sample its offering. The Pump Room I visited was a new version built in 1777 to replace an older one originally constructed in 1706. Apparently, the excavation process of this new Pump Room led to the discovery of the Roman Temple.

In case you are wondering, I did not drink the water when I was there. Remembering its green, murky origins a few feet below, not to mention its smell of Sulphur and its reputation for tasting awful, was enough to discourage my sense of adventure. I suppose if any of my characters ever drink the water, I will have to get more detailed second-hand accounts of its taste.

But let us return Georgian society in Bath. With the arrival of the wealthy, some of whom only stayed for the summer, and others who made Bath their permanent home, beautiful homes and neighborhoods cropped up, including The Circus, a circular-shaped neighborhood of beautiful townhomes, and Royal Crescent, an even more upscale set of luxury mansion-style townhomes in the shape of a crescent as its name suggests. I toured one of these townhomes, Number One Royal Crescent, which is a glimpse into life as a wealthy, Georgian gentleman.

                                         The Royal Crescent

 

Jane Austen lived in Bath for several years with her family. While many claim that Jane disliked living in Bath, a large portion of two of her novels, Northanger Abbey and Persuasion, took place in Bath which she portrays as an exciting and lovely place.

Bath Abbey

 

Beyond enchanting, Bath has a timelessness about it. Walking the streets, I easily imagined myself a character in a Jane Austen novel. Strolling along the river, having afternoon tea in the Pump Room, prowling the streets,  and exploring the Roman Baths creates a sense of having time traveled. With each step I took, I could almost see images of those who’d trod those cobbled paths before me including kings and queens, lords and ladies, and poets and authors including our beloved Jane Austen.

My interest in Bath began long before I visited this fascinating city. Five years ago I wrote my Regency Romance novel, A Perfect Secret, which has a few chapters that take place in Bath. Now I may have to write another book that takes place in this ancient and unique town just to relive my adventures there.

The Avon running under Pulteney Bridge

 

 

 

Sources:

My research for this post comes from personal experience as I toured Bath. However, you might enjoy these other sites for more information:

Taking Cure in Bath

The Lakes District and Slate Rock

Like the millions of visitors before me, the Lakes District instilled in me a sense of wonder and awe. The beauty of the area is balanced by a yesteryear charm, including unspoiled vistas, the multitude of lakes also called “meres” and “waters,” delightful names such as Windermere, Ambleside, and Loweswater, and the preservation of history. They even  have a stone circle called Castlerigg that predates Stonehenge.

There is something magical about this area. The colors are more vivid, the light more pure, the landscape more natural and more passionate than any I’ve ever visited. I could point my camera in any old direction with zero to no set up and capture a print-worthy image. Even the photos of me in the area turned out well, and that’s saying something!

Once of the many fascinating aspects of the area was the use of slate stones to build fences, barns, bridges, businesses, and pretty much any type of structure. When the early settlers found farming difficult due to the multitude of stones in their fields, they removed the offending elements, and like any enterprising settler skilled at making lemons out of lemonade, put these rocks to good use in constructing all their buildings. Slate rock was readily available, study, and durable—perfect for building material.

Today, the skill used to build these stone structures is in danger of becoming a lost art. They use a technique called dry stone. Builders literally use dry stones, with no mortar or cement to glue them together. Like a master puzzle solver, the specialist meticulously chooses each rock for its shape and size, and fits them together to create a strong structure that holds up to animals, weather, and even time itself.

A technique called stone cladding, is placing a thinner layer of stone to the outside of buildings. Unlike shingles, siding or stucco, stones never need painting and seldom need repairs or replacing. Some of the buildings also had a white exterior called pebble dash, which is similar to stucco but uses local materials.

Slate rock structures are just one of the many unique and memorable reasons I fell in love with the Lakes District of England. I fell in love with this beautiful part of England and fully expect to set at not so distant future novel in the magical Lakes District.

 

 

 

Americans vs Brits Book Giveaway

***Contest closed***

Win up to 14 American vs British eBooks!

You are invited to join this multi-author event and settle the question of which you love more–American romances or British romances. I was lucky enough to be invited to participate. My Regency Romance, The Stranger She Married, is included in this grand event. You might win as many as ALL the books in this promotion.

Enter the giveaway here: http://AuthorsXP.com/giveaway

(2) Grand Prize “Gift Baskets” of ALL eBooks!
(13+) Winners of Individual eBooks (randomly selected titles)

Read more about these authors and books below!

http://AuthorsXP.com/giveaway

Hurry! Giveaway ends August 21, 2017. Winners will be announced August 22, 2017.

London Townhouses, the Servants’ Entrance

                                London Townhouse

If you’ve studied history or read historical novels, you probably have a good idea of a few of the differences between the rich and the poor. By the Regency, there was a growing middle class, but they were new and small. Many of these fairly well to do members were working class who had made money in trade of some kind such as factories, banks, or shipping. But the vast majority of England’s population still fit into either the rich or poor category. Of course, there were layers within those categories, but it came down to working class versus ladies and gentlemen of leisure. And nothing draws that distinct line more sharply than does the door through which one was admitted when entering a London townhouse.

The servants entrance or tradesmen entrance of a London townhouse

Family and guests entered through the front door. But the working class, including servants and deliverymen, entered through the servants entrance.

Boot scraper at the front door of a London townhouse

When I was in London this summer, I was surprised to discover that these two doors were only a few linear feet apart, but yet they were worlds apart. The front door might be at the street level, or it might be raised by a few steps, depending on the contours of the land on which it was built. Many front doors of London townhouses have columns or pilasters which are flat pillars, a boot scraper where gentleman could scrape mud and other undesirables from their boots before entering, and ornate trim such as a fan light over the door, and perhaps even friezes. Most front doors boasted bright colors such as red or blue or rich green. On either side of the door one often saw potted plants, flowers or topiaries. On either side of this lovely entrance ran a wrought iron fence.

The servants entrance or tradesmen entrance of a London townhouse. Today this probably leads to the front door of a flat on the lower level.

The servants entrance however, is accessed through a gate in the wrought iron fence. Today, these wrought iron fences are mostly black or gray, a tradition that started in the Victorian Era. However, during the Regency, these fences could be any color, shades of blues and greens seemed most popular. The gate in the fence which lead to the servants entrance below was locked at night. To get to the servants’ entrance one must go through the gate, down a step and sometimes winding flight of stairs, across a small area open to the sky, and then through the kitchen door which was often almost directly below the front door.

The servants entrance or tradesmen entrance of a London townhouse.

If a servant or deliveryman had the audacity to knock on the front door, the butler would instantly direct them to go to the servants entrance. Can you imagine carrying boxes or parcels down such a steep flight of steps? And yet, most people seemed to think nothing of the reminders of one’s social station, including separate entrances.

Today, many of these townhouses are broken up into separate apartments, or flats, but the reminders of by gone eras remain prevalent in London’s townhouses.

Fortunately, my heroes and heroines of my Regency romance novels are usually members of the upper classes and so enter through the front door.

 

Sources: Most of my knowledge comes from years of research, as well as my observations during my trip to London. However, another source for further reading is Gaelen Foley’s excellent blog about Regency  Country House & Townhouse.

 

 

 

 

200th Anniversary of Jane Austen’s Death

Today is a special post to remember Jane Austen on this, the 200th anniversary of her death, with a few photos of her cottage in Chawton. What a mark she made in history! I hope you enjoy these photos I took during my recent trip to England.

Jane and her mother and sister, Cassandra lived in Chawton, courtesy her brother, during the latter part of Jane’s life. According to historians, Jane was happiest here because she could write to her heart’s content. Her books were first published to wide acclaim, though she never published under her real name until after her life. Hundreds of adaptations, both literary and in film have been made of her stories.

Jane Austen and her witty, unique novels such as Pride & Prejudice influenced nations and inspired innumerable authors, including me. So, on this day, I just want to say thank you to Jane for her stories.

Why Regency is my Passion

I love many eras in history, but my favorite is the Regency. There are many reasons for this favorite. It was such a unique–and short–time in history. The Regency came amidst much social and economic change, filled with turmoil and trouble. What draws me to is are the customs and people who lived in that time. This may be a skewed and romanticized vision, but British gentlemen who live long ago as seemed more honorable than we are today. In Regency England, duty and honor were everything. With few exception, if a gentleman said he’d do something, especially if he gave his word, he meant it; others could count him to follow through, even if it came a great personal cost.

By the Georgian and Regency Eras, gentlemen and ladies alike were educated and could read, compute complex mathematics, speak multiple languages—French and German seemed to be particular favorites and boys were taught Latin in school. They loved philosophical debates.

They were also very cultured. From a young age they were taught to dance, play musical instruments, sing, paint, and recite poetry. Even many of those of the working classes were receiving an education at that time, an unprecedented movement in England.

I love the way people in Regency England spoke so eloquently. The upper classes didn’t maul the language—they used correct grammar and had an enormous vocabulary. They prized wit and excelled in using the famous British understatement. I love their dry humor. They also spoke and wrote beautifully and spent a great deal of time writing stories, poems, letters, and journaling. Jane Austen’s novels are almost like poetry. She carefully chose each word for its wording, imagery, and rhythm to deliver the exact nuance she wanted.

Gentlemen were civilized and treated ladies with courtesy in a hundred little ways. They stood when a lady entered the room, doffed their hats, bowed, curtailed their language, offered an arm, and more. They were also athletic; they hunted, raced, fenced, boxed, rode horses. They were manly. Strong. Noble. Resolute. Honorable. I love that about them! All of this is what makes them perfect heroes for both historical fiction and Regency romance novels.

By the Regency Era, ladies and gentlemen had gotten rid of those powdered wigs of the past few centuries, toned down previously excessive manner of dress which once included excessive ruffles and lace, and even–my personal favorite–bathed daily. Men’s three-piece suits worn today are patterned after Regency gentlemen’s clothing.

Another aspect of the Regency that draws me is that it landed in the middle of the Napoleonic Wars, which creates a natural backdrop for tension and conflict. Men and boys went off to war. Some didn’t come home; others came home but were forever changed. This darkness in history creates what’s known as the tortured hero, and I love helping my fictional tortured heroes find peace and healing, and matching them up with ladies who understand and love them.

The Regency is a charming, unforgettable era thanks to literary masters such as Jane Austen and Georgette Heyer. I only hope to do their legacy justice.

Do you have a favorite era in history? What is it and why does it fascinate you?