Cover Reveal for new Regency Historical Romance Novel

I’m super excited to share with you the cover for my new book titled Courting the Countess. This all-new novel launches a new series, but still features a few characters you may recognize from my Rogue Hearts Series. And since this series pre-dates the Rogue Hearts, you’ll even get the meet the parents of the unconventional Amesbury siblings.

Haven’t read the Rogue Hearts? No worries; this is a stand-alone novel so you can start with this one if you are so inclined.

So, are you ready to see the new cover?

Okay, here we go:

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Ta da!

Isn’t it lovely?

This new novel will be available to purchase in October, but can be pre-ordered now so you don’t have to remember to order it when it is released. Just follow this link to pre-order your copy now.

Here is the back cover blurb for Courting the Countess:

When charming rake Tristan Barrett sweeps Lady Elizabeth off her feet, stealing both her heart and a kiss in a secluded garden, her brother challenges Tristan to a duel. The only way to save her brother and Tristan from harm—not to mention preserve her reputation—is to get married. But her father, the Duke of Pemberton, refuses to allow his daughter to marry anyone but a titled lord. The duke demands that Elizabeth marry Tristan’s older brother, Richard, the Earl of Averston. Now Elizabeth must give up Tristan to marry a man who despises her, a man who loves another, a man she’ll never love.

Richard fears Elizabeth is as untrustworthy as his mother, who abandoned him when she ran off with another man. However, to protect his brother from a duel and their family name from further scandal, he agrees to wedding Lady Elizabeth, certain his new bride will betray him. Yet when Elizabeth turns his house upside down and worms her way into his reluctant heart, Richard suspects he can’t live without his new countess. Will she stay with him or is it too little, too late?

Pre-order your copy of Courting the Countess here.

 

Cover Reveal for Sweet Regency Romance Novel, Heartstrings

Announcing my newest sweet Regency romance novel, Heartstrings.

Synopsis:
Gently bred young ladies don’t run away from home to find employment, but when forced to choose between marrying a brutish oaf or becoming another man’s mistress, Susanna makes an unconventional decision. Following her passion for music, she flees to London with dreams of securing a position as a harpist. Becoming entangled with a handsome violinist who calls himself Kit, but who seems too aristocratic for a working-class musician, may be more problematic than sleeping in the streets.

Kit’s attention is captured by Susanna’s breath-taking talent, admirable grace, and winsome smiles…until a lawman exposes the new harpist as a runaway bride and a thief. With peril lurking in the shadows, Susanna’s imminent danger not only forces Kit to choose between his better judgment and his heart, but he must also embrace the life to which he swore he would never return.

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And now … are you ready to see the wonderful new cover??

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To celebrate, I’m having a cover reveal party on Facebook, going on all day, with lots of chances to win free stuff, including Amazon gift cards. So please come join the fun! Follow this link to the fun!

Why Pirates?

Blackbeard_battle_colourPirates. Few words conjure up more dramatic, terrifying, and yet oddly romantic images than pirates. They captured the imagination of Robert Lewis Stevenson, J.M. Barrie, Walt Disney, and many others. I even used pirates in my Regency Romance Novel, The Guise of a Gentleman, book 2 of the Rogue Hearts series. But what is it, exactly that makes a pirate both the perfect villain and the perfect hero?

When I was a child, one of my favorite rides at Disneyland was “The Pirates of the Caribbean. I loved Peter Pan, Treasure Island, and any other pirate story I found. The Pirates of the Caribbean movie made millions with fans divided between Captain Jack Sparrow and Will, who pretty much turned pirate to save Elizabeth. When my husband and I were in Las Vegas, we went to the (then) new Treasure Island Hotel which used to (maybe still does?) put on a great show outside with a reenactment of the navy battling pirates. When the pirates defeated the navy, everybody cheered. Including me.

Are we all a bunch of sociopaths?

Nah. I think it goes back to the bad boy allure. They were non-conformists. They had the courage to buck the system. They wore blousy white shirts instead of those stuffy coats and ugly hats and white powdered wigs. They were totally free to go where ever they pleased and do anything they wanted. And they had the money to do it, thanks to the plunder they took. In the case of Las Vegas, the pirate captain was hunky and drop dead gorgeous, which never hurts.

We think of pirates as swashbuckling hunks who carried big curved swords, although having an eye patch and a parrot on the shoulder never hurts. Not to mention a certain allure in a map with an X that marks the spot to buried wealth. Maybe we all secretly wish we could steal from the rich, throw social norms out the window and make our enemies walk the plank.

It’s really just a fantasy. Most real pirates are nothing like the men in the stories.
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While researching for The Guise of a Gentleman, I discovered that pirates were first and foremost sailors. They had a hard life and faced many dangers. They also preyed upon any ship that had the misfortune of crossing their path. Then, they’d go to a nearby port and waste their money. They also often ransacked towns, tortured men, and ravished women. And they were notorious slave traders. Not very glamorous, is it?

After studying real life pirates like Black Beard, Calico Jack, and others, I decided pirates make better villains than heroes. They were for the most part, ruthless and unconscionable. Yet, I still cheered for Captain Jack Sparrow and Will Turner. And in truth, some real pirates really were good men caught in difficult circumstances.

In my novel, I created a fictional problem of having a lot of out of work sailors and captains of privateer ships now that the Napoleonic War was over, so some turned to piracy and created a pirate ring led by a peer of the realm. The hero, Jared Amesbury, is a government agent assigned to to become a pirate in order to infiltrate the ring and expose the leader.

So enjoy the fantasy about pirates. And “Argh, matey! Don’ forgit yer sword!”

The Guise of a Gentleman, book 2 of the Rogue Hearts series, is available at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and everywhere books are sold.

New Release: Announcing THE SUSPECT’S DAUGHTER

Readers asked for it, so they got it–the story of the dark and mysterious Grant Amesbury who, in the course of his brothers’ books, gives glimpses into a tender heart buried far below layers of protective sarcasm. His story, at long last, is told in book 4 of the Rogue Hearts Series,  The Suspect’s Daughter coming December 15, 2015.  

As a present to my readers, I hurried up production to get this published before Christmas.  You’re welcome.

The Suspect’s Daughter is available for pre-order now exclusively through Amazon. Pre-orders are crucial to a book’s success–it allows the highest possible number of sales to happen simultaneously–the best way a book achieves the coveted “best seller” label. So please follow the link now to pre-order a copy for yourself and for your favorite historical romance readers–friend, sister, mom, teacher, aunt, etc.

     Come join my book blog tour and win lots of great prizes and free stuff all week long at Prism Book Tours.

On Tour with Prism Book Tours.

Book Tour for
The Suspect’s Daughter
By Donna Hatch

Tour Schedule
12/9: Bookworm LisaGetting Your Read On, & I Am A Reader
12/10: Katie’s Clean Book CollectionTeatime and Books, & Reading Is My SuperPower
12/11: Christy’s Cozy Cornersunderneath the covers, & Colorimetry
12/13: deal sharing auntRockin’ Book Reviews, & Wishful Endings
12/14: Bookworm NationSinging Librarian Books
12/15: Release-Day Grand Finale

Introduction to The Suspect’s Daughter

Though Grant Amesbury is a cynic and a loner, his brothers always turned to him when they needed help. He’d be the last one to classify himself as a dark knight, but he thrives on chasing down villains and dragging them to justice–dead or alive. Intriguing and enigmatic, Grant has captivated readers since the first book in the series, The Stranger She Married, hit bookstores. And each time he appeared in subsequent books, The Guise of a Gentleman, and A Perfect Secret, his fan base grew as did requests for his very own story.

Now, at long last, his story is told in The Suspect’s Daughter. The Suspect’s Daughter is book 4 of The Rogue Hearts Series, but it is written as a stand-alone novel. There are a few references to previous incidents and people in other books, but readers will easily follow the overall series story line.

In this new novel, Grant has met his match. Not only is Jocelyn his perfect opposite–light to his darkness–but she matches him in wit and courage. But Jocelyn has her own problems, and a troublesome man does not fit into her plans.

— Donna

The Suspect’s Daughter
(Rogue Hearts, #4)
by Donna Hatch
Adult Historical Romance
Paperback & ebook, 298 pages
December 15th 2015

Pre-order now exclusively through Amazon

Determined to help her father with his political career, Jocelyn sets aside dreams of love. When she meets the handsome and mysterious Grant Amesbury, her dreams of true love reawaken. But his secrets put her family in peril.

Grant goes undercover to capture conspirators avowed to murder the prime minister, but his only suspect is the father of a courageous lady who is growing increasingly hard to ignore. He can’t allow Jocelyn to distract him from the case, nor will he taint her with his war-darkened soul. She seems to see past the barriers surrounding his heart, which makes her all the more dangerous to his vow of remaining forever alone.

Jocelyn will do anything to clear her father’s name, even if that means working with Grant. Time is running out. The future of England hangs in the balance…and so does their love.

Tour Giveaway

$10 Amazon eGift Card
2 ebooks of A Winter’s Knight
2 ebooks of Mistletoe Magic
Open internationally
Ends December 19th

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Book Giveaway

Original cover

*****Giveaway Closed*****

It’s time to celebrate the upcoming release of book 4 in my award-winning “Rogue Hearts Regency Series,” The Suspect’s Daughter, available December 3, 2015.  Celebrating is always more fun with friends. So, I am giving away five copies of book 3, A Perfect Secret which features Grant who is the hero of book 4. Winners have a choice of receiving a paperback copy or a digital copy for ebook readers.

A Perfect Secret has received a new cover, but the story is the same as the original. The version I am giving away has the first cover, pictured to the left.

It is my hope that these copies will go to someone who has not yet read any of my books, but anyone can enter the drawing.

Here is the back cover blurb for my “clean and wholesome” Regency Romance:

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Desperate to protect her father from trial and execution, Genevieve breaks off her engagement to Christian Amesbury and marries her father’s blackmailer. After a year of marriage, she flees her husband’s violent domination only to have fate bring her back to Christian. Just when she thinks she’s started a new life of safety and freedom, her husband tracks her down, stalks her, and threatens everyone she loves.

Still brokenhearted over Genevieve’s betrayal a year ago, Christian can’t believe she’s come back into his life–and worse, that she’s done it on the anniversary of his brother’s death, a death that haunts him. Though tempted to throw her back into the river where he found her, he can’t abandon her, nor can he leave her at the mercy of the terrifying man she married. When her husband torments Genevieve and puts the Amesbury family in danger, Christian will do anything to protect those he loves…anything except give Genevieve another chance to break his heart.

To enter the drawing, simply put your name and email address in the comments section below. If you want a second chance to win, “like” my author Facebook page and put “I liked your page” in your comment.

Rules:

No purchase necessary.

Giveaway open to everyone; US and Canada may receive paperback copies or digital upon request.

International winners will receive digital copies. Void where prohibited.

And the winners are:

Sireena, Julia, Heidi, Jerika, and Heather. Whoo hoo! (throws confetti)

Thank you so much to everyone who entered my giveaway.

 

 

Carriage Accidents Cliche?

WLA_nyhistorical_Beekman_Family_Coachby Donna Hatch

Throughout most of history, travelling, especially long distance, was a dangerous undertaking. Some of the many dangers a traveler in Regency England faced included highwaymen attacks, most of which only resulted in loss of valuables but often injury and death as well. To offset this risk, the wealthy generally had armed outriders who rode horseback in front and behind the carriage to guard and protect them but not everyone could afford that and sometimes highway men attacked in alarming numbers.

Travelers also faced broken down carriages which caused delays and inconveniences and injuries, especially if their coach traveled at high speeds at the time of the malfunction. In addition, weather accounted for difficulty and danger. There are accounts of passengers riding on the top of a mail coach arriving frozen to death. But by far the most dangerous part of travel came from carriage accidents.

Now, don’t roll your eyes. I’ve heard readers complain that it’s too easy to kill off a character by arranging a convenient carriage accident so that they have become cliché. However, as cliché as it may seem, carriage accidents were every bit as common as car accidents are today. And since I’ve been in seven car accidents, either as a passenger or as a driver, ranging from minor fender benders to car-totaling collisions, and several people I love have suffered life-threatening injuries as a result of car accidents, I’m painfully aware how frequently that happens.

High_flyer_phaeton_carriage,_1816Just as there are many reasons for car accidents today, carriage accidents could be caused by any number of difficulties. Traveling at high speeds increased the likelihood of a major wipe out. (No, that’s not a Regency term J High-perched carriages such as the High-flyer phaeton were top heavy and easily overturned, especially in the hands of an unskilled driver. But carriages in general were subject to all kinds of problems and breakdowns. Maintenance was up to the coachman, but if he wasn’t especially diligent, there were any number of parts to a carriage that could break and cause accidents.

Roads were another cause of difficulty. They were poorly maintained, often muddy, rutted, narrow and windy. They were also snowy or icy. Toll roads usually fared better, but not always. Also, the horses themselves could throw a shoe or stumble over a rut or uneven ground which posed a threat to the carriage.

But other drivers were some of the greatest perils on the roads. There were no speed limits, and no driver’s licenses, and driving while intoxicated wasn’t policed. Drunk drivers or young dare devils careening around bends caused an alarming number of accidents. And since there were no seat belts or crash safety engineering, passengers could be thrown around or crushed or ejected.

It paints a terrifying picture, doesn’t it? The next time you read a book where the heroine’s parents died in a carriage accident, remember that they were an alarmingly common and therefore very realistic form of premature death. Instead of rolling your eyes and uttering the dreaded C word, nod sagely and applaud the author’s realism.

 

 

 

Spotlight on author Jennifer Bryce

Today my spotlight is author Jennifer Bryce and her very first published book, Haley’s Song. This romance is squeaky clean, with a courageous heroine and a dreamy hero.

I thought I had first met Jennifer at a writer’s conference when she sought me out upon the recommendation of a mutual writer friend to get help editing her first book. But she later reminded me that we had met about ten years before; she’d done my hair when I’d moved to her town. (Jenn has a much better memory than I do.) But my family only lived there about six months, so we’d only had a few chances to talk when she’d worked on my hair (and a fabulous job she did, too).  Anyway, years later, we met again and I made suggestions on how she could improve her book. Jennifer worked really hard on revisions, submited to a publisher, got a contract offer, and now her first book is available.

In Haley’s Song, the stakes are high, the heroine is smart and brave, the hero is as likable as he is realistic, and there is a full cast of fun, quirky characters. It has a vintage, wild west feel to it. Here is more info:

Big Haley's SongSynopsis:
Hayley’s father has a gambling problem that’s now become hers. He lost her in a bet. Now, she must either leave the only place she’s ever known or marry a brute who is only interested in a servant he can control.

On the run and scared, she finds sanctuary at a ranch with seven men and one little boy. Though hired as a cook and nanny, she quickly realizes she’s found a home. With brothers, Ben and Tate, vying for her affections, Hayley starts to believe she can have a life that doesn’t involve alcohol, abuse, and gambling. But the winner of the card game has other plans.

Ed Thompson tracks Hayley down, determined she’s going to become his wife. But Tate isn’t about to allow that to happen. He’ll move whatever mountain he has to for Hayley’s safety. And when she’s kidnapped, he’ll tear the town apart to find her. But Ed has an ace up his sleeve that could end up getting Hayley killed.

Here is a short excerpt from Haley’s Song:

“Hey Gummy, how did you get your name?” Curiosity pushed her to ask as she helped Johnny sit next to her on the bench. She expected him to say it was because he always chewed gum.

“I’m a natural born scrapper as a lad and got into plenty of fights.  Once when a fight was in full swing, my gum came out of my mouth and stuck in my hair. The name Gummy ‘stuck.’” The jack of all trades chuckled. “You’re a scrapper like me. We can handle a little opposition.”

About The Author

Jen BryceJennifer has a brain that is never quiet (even in her sleep). She uses writing as an escape to be and do anything she can create. Plotting is her favorite thing to do in her down time. Raised in southern Arizona, she was influenced by being raised a cop’s daughter (plenty of teenage angst material there), Mexican food, and the old West. She is a busy mother to three rambunctious boys, is married to her amazing cowboy, she’s  a full-time nursing student, and she desperately needs a long vacation. Her biggest fear in life is to be completely mediocre.

Author Social Media links:

Facebook: Author Jennifer Bryce

BlogSpot: jenniferbryce.blogspot.com

Twitter: @JenniferBryce1

 

 

 

 

 

Book giveaway

0708142138Before I became an author, I was a reader. Still am. I read all kinds of books–historical, fantasy, young adult, inspirational, science fiction, paranormal, and others.  My favorite books are historical, specifically historical romance, but I like my novels “sweet,” meaning, without swear words or sex scenes. Finding books that don’t have those can be tricky. However, there are some authors that I know will always be clean.

Recently, I moved my office into a different room and got it all arranged. As I did so, I went through a bunch of paperback books on my bookshelf and realized I had more books than I needed. Since there are very few books that I ever read a second time, I decided to give a few of them away. They are all clean or sweet romances. The authors of the books I’m giving away are: Shirley Kennedy, Regina Scott, Janet Dean, and Melanie Dickerson. If you’d like to enter the giveaway, please tell me what is your favorite historical era  in the Rafflecopter below.

You have more chances to win if you follow me on Facebook and/or Twitter.

I will contact you via email to ask for your address so I can mail the books to you.

Sorry, due to the high cost of mailing a box internationally, not to mention the time involved, this contest is only open to the U.S. and Canada.
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Jane Austen’s Influence on The Historical Romance Novel

jane-austenWho is the greatest fiction author of all time? That question would no doubt be greeted by a host of answers and responses, and would largely depend on the type of fiction each person enjoys reading. For many of us who enjoy historical romance novels, our resounding answer is: Jane Austen.

Jane Austen had a way of writing literature stood the test of time. Did she know this when she wrote her novels? Did she have any idea of how influential her works would be on the historical romance genre? Not likely. In fact, some of her works were not even published until after she died. Let’s examine how Jane Austen has influenced the historical romance novel. Then, I’ll attempt to guess what she would think of most romance novels today.

Jane Austen’s plots are often repeated in romance novels through the decades. For example, in Pride & Prejudice, the plot revolves around a case of mistaken first impressions. The principal characters start out with an aversion to one another only to discover that they are actually attracted to one another. In Sense and Sensibility, we see a hero who falls in love with one woman while being bound to another and also a heroine whose romantic sensibilities nearly bring about her ruin. In Mansfield Park, the main characters are related, and therefore, an unsuspected but not unheard of love plot unfolds. Northanger Abby is Jane Austen’s parody of the Gothic novel so popular in her day. Emma employs a pedagogic relationship between a much older man who corrects and scolds the younger Emma. Persuasion highlights a love deserving a second chance.

Many of these romantic situations have been retold in other historical romance novels. In Sanditon by Jane Austen and “A Lady” (the mysterious author who finished the unfinished manuscript), there is a clear relationship between Jane Austen’s works and modern-day historical romance novels. The unknown author “A Lady” who finished this incomplete work of Jane Austen’s,wrote the ending much like a modern-day Regency romance novel. It is unlike Jane Austen’s style in that it is fast paced, flirty, and has a twist at the end. But, it is difficult to discern at what point Jane Austen stops and A Lady picks up. This is not the only version of the book. I started to read another author’s finishing of the novel only to stop when I got to a sex scene, something Jane Austen never put in her novels.

These examples showcase how much Jane Austen has influenced the romance novels of today. However, the question remains: What would Austen think of most of the romance novels published today? Northanger Abby says it well; “Perhaps after all it is possible to read too many novels.” We can be sure Austen would only approve of clean romance novels that prized wit and a bit of sarcasm, like her own timeless tales.

 

Historical Fiction – My Favorite Escape

Historical Fiction – My Favorite Escape

In a recent survey, 80% of avid readers listed historical novels as one of their top three favorite types of books to read. I wasn’t really surprised, since historical fiction, especially historical romance fiction, is my favorite genre. But it got me thinking; why the broad appeal?

First, historical novels provide a fantastic escape. When life gets stressful, the first thing I like to do is pick up a novel. When I read a historical novel, I am transported to another place and time, to a setting so completely different from my reality, that it feels like a vacation without the hassle and expense of travel. Immersing myself into someone else’s life and seeing them triumph over all gives me a lift that lasts long after I close the book. Total escapism can and does happen with modern-day novels, but the less the book contains about present-day issues, the better an escape it provides. Plus, historical fiction lends itself to lovelier, more lyrical writing that modern day or futuristic novels often lack.

Second, historical novels appeal to the closet history buff. Most authors pride themselves on careful research—myself included—so we put a great deal of effort into getting our facts straight. I know an attorney who loves learning about the Napoleonic Wars and has an entire wall in his library devoted to books—both fiction and nonfiction—about that particular war. I have other friends who adore Jane Austen era novels, so they devour any books set in the Jane Austen Era or the Regency Era. As a Regency romance author, I continue to extensively research English history, particularly the early 1800’s, so I can create a virtual trip through time. Having my facts straight is not just a pretty backdrop for my stories; the manners and mores of society helped shape people who lived in that time, both those who embraced customs of the time, and those who challenged them.

Third, historical novels help teach others about a particular time in history. Many school teachers incorporate historical novels into their curriculum in addition to non-fiction. Adding historical fiction novels helps round out students’ education, gives students a personal, up-close look at history as seen through the eyes of the characters, and it blends history into a story with larger-than-life characters which helps bring the past to vivid, colorful life.

How many of us learned more about the Civil War watching or reading Gone with the Wind than we ever learned in American History class? If Georgette Heyer and other great historical authors had never taken an interest English history—specifically the Regency Era—most of us would never have heard of the Regency Era, or why it was such a unique and important time in British history.

When I was researching pirates for my pirate novel, The Guise of a Gentleman, I read many non-fiction books about pirates—Blackbeard in particular—and took a detailed on line class about pirates and ships and sailing. Lastly, to fill in the blanks, I read several novels about pirates and about sea captains from the 1600’s to the 1800’s. All of this helped provide a solid base upon which I could build my pirate story with confidence that I had the knowledge to not only portray the life of a pirate aboard a ship, but also get into their minds and figure out what drove them to their chosen lives.

I love many things about historical fiction, but I suppose it comes right down to the people who lived in that time. This may be a skewed and romanticized vision, but I see the people who live long ago as being more honorable than we are today. In Regency England, duty and honor were everything. If a man said he’d do something, especially if he gave his word, he meant it, and others could count him to follow through, even if it came a great personal cost.

I love the way people in Regency England spoke so eloquently. The upper classes didn’t maul the language—they used correct grammar and had an enormous vocabulary. They also prized wit and excelled in using the understatement. Jane Austen novels are almost like poetry. She carefully chose each word for its beautiful wording, imagery, and rhythm.

By the Georgian and Regency Eras, men and women alike were educated and could read, compute complex mathematics, speak multiple languages—French and Latin in particular—and loved philosophical debates. They were also very cultured. From a young age they were taught to dance, play music, sing, and recite poetry.

Men in many historical eras were civilized and treated women with courtesy by standing up when a lady entered the room, doffed their hats, curtailed their language, offered an arm, bowed, and a hundred other little things I wish men still did today. But they were also very athletic; they hunted, raced, fenced, boxed, rode horses. They were manly. Strong. Noble. Resolute. Honorable. I love that about them! And that makes them perfect heroes for both historical fiction and historical romance novels.

Historical Fiction, along with all its subgenres, whether it’s Medieval, Georgian, Regency, Victorian, or any other historical time, is a here-to-stay genre. And I, for one, am delighted!