Gifts for the Regency Geek

This year, I put together a wish list of totally impractical items I’d love to have for Christmas–you know the kind–not a KitchenAid mixer or a new pair of shoes, although I’d love to have those, too. Sometimes it’s fun to get personal, frivolous items that I don’t “need.” Here are some geeky gifts I’d love to have.

This first selection is of hatpins. Ladies wore these to keep their hats from blowing away. Many bonnets tied under the chin, but some of the more decorative hats required pins such as these to keep them in place. You thread these hat pins through the hat and your hair. I have a couple of hats that would look lovely with any of these. I’m partial to the pearl-style hat pins shown here.

The cameo was a popular piece of jewellry for many years in Britain and saw an increase in popularity during King George III’s reign. It was still a preferred adornment during the Regency. I could wear any of these with most of my outfits but the blue is my favorite.

This charm is reminiscent of the quills and inkwells used during the Regency before the invention of the fountain pen. This one has a silhouette of Jane Austen on the inkwell. People had to carefully sharpen the ends of the quills to use them, which required patience and skill. And however did they learn not to dribble ink all over their parchment? After writing, the ink had to be sanded — sand was sprinkled all over the paper then carefully blown or poured off. Sand could be reused.

Here is a pattern of Regency underthings. In my quest to put together a completely authentic Regency ensemble, I’m in need of a pattern for a slip-like garment which they called a chemise, or shift, or chemisette during the Regency. This pattern looks as authentic as any I’ve seen, although the sleeves don’t need to be that long. Shifts were generally made out of a linen or cotton and were also often worn as sleepwear. Since the washing procedures were so harsh, undergarments had to be replaced often. Also shown are “short stays.” Normally only the poorer classes wore these because they didn’t give quite as nice of a silhouette but they are practical because they easily tie in front, unlike long stays which were tied in back.

Lastly, hat wardrobe would not be complete without a parasol such as this one? Parasols were a vital part of a lady’s ensemble when she went out of doors to keep her complexion creamy and un-freckled. Even a hat or bonnet was not always perfect protection from the elements. Besides, being lovely and functional, they could also be a great way to hide one’s face when the occasion calls for it.

Gloves are essential to a Regency lady’s ensemble as well–probably more so than the parasol. However, I have a pair of gloves (not authentic but they work) so they aren’t on my wish list.  Although, I saw some pretty lace gloves I’d love to have. And I’ve always wanted to try a pair of “kid” gloves. Sigh. A costume geek’s work is never done.

What did you see that you’d love to receive as a gift?

 

 

I found these fun gifts at the Jane Austen Centre Gift Shop

One thought on “Gifts for the Regency Geek

  1. Marilyn says:

    I want one of each of those on your wish list. Every object is lovely. Hope Santa Claus is listening to this post. Wishing you and yours a Merry Christmas and a 2017 full of blessings.
    Marilyn

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